List Of All National Parks And If They Allow Hammocks


Hammocks are a wonderful invention, I will always have one with me when I go camping. If you are like me and you love camping in National Parks, then you might have wondered which National Parks actually allow you to use your hammock. I took the time and did the research to find the answer for every National Park in the United States and whether or not you can use a hammock in the parks.

So, are hammocks allowed in National Parks? Hammocks are allowed to be used in most National Parks. Some National Parks do have specific guidelines for hammock usage. There are 61 total parks with the “National Park” designation and they all have their own rules on hammocks.

Here is an alphabetical list of all 61 National Parks in the United States and whether or not they allow hammocks to be used.

By the way, If you are in the market for a new hammock, then you should click here to see the one I recommend on Amazon.

Acadia National Park, Maine

Hammock camping is allowed in developed campgrounds within Acadia National Park. There is no dispersed or backcountry camping in Acadia National Park so you cannot hammock camp outside of designated campgrounds.

You can also use hammocks outside of campgrounds for day use purposes. There are no specific rules prohibiting the use of hammocks in Acadia National Park. The park’s rules and regulations can be found here.Opens in a new tab.

Arches National Park, Utah

Hammock camping is allowed in the one developed campground within the park. Backpacking is allowed, but a permit is required, although hammock camping would prove very difficult in this park since trees are extremely sparse.

Using a hammock is very difficult in Arches National Park due to the sparse population of tress. Arches are very well protected as well as most of them are not allowed to be climbed on, and tying hammock straps would prove difficult. There are no specific rules against hammock usage as you can see on the park’s regulation page hereOpens in a new tab..

Badlands National Park, South Dakota

Hammock camping is allowed in the developed campgrounds and in the backcountry. Good luck finding a suitable hammock area in the backcountry. The developed campgrounds have shaded picnic tables that could be used for hammock camping.

While finding a place to hang a hammock outside of the developed campgrounds would prove difficult, it is not expressly forbidden according to the policies page for Badlands National Park, which can be found here.Opens in a new tab.

Big Bend National Park, Texas

Hammock camping can be done in the developed campgrounds but not hung from any natural structures. This makes it very difficult, but some people have used the pavilions that are in the campground. This also means that you aren’t supposed to use any of the hard to come by trees in the campground area of the park.

There is no hammock usage allowed in the backcountry. In fact, you can see in this document Opens in a new tab.that hammock usage is expressly forbidden to be attached/tied to trees or any other natural features or objects.

Biscayne National Park, Florida

There are no rules expressly against using hammocks in Biscayne National Park. At least not found on the park’s rules and regulations pageOpens in a new tab.. The campground located within the park has many palm trees that hammocks could be used on. Palm trees are one of the more ideal trees to hang a hammock on. Double-check with park staff since there is a lot of protections given to this National Park.

Black Canyon of the Gunnison National Park, Colorado

Hammock camping in the campgrounds located within Black Canyon of the Gunnison National Park should be relatively easy since many of the campgrounds have a lot of trees. There are no rules expressly forbidding hammock camping in the campgrounds.

Backcountry camping is also allowed in the Black Canyon of the Gunnison National Park. Hammock camping within the park is very doable, as is hanging a hammock for day use purposes. Nowhere on their policies pageOpens in a new tab. or related documents is there any rule that says hammocks may not be used. Of course, you should always be considerate and ask the park staff if you want to be extra cautious.

Bryce Canyon National Park, Utah

You may not use hammocks within Bryce Canyon National Park. Nothing (including hammocks) may be hung from the trees within the National Park. You can, however, set up a hammock using free-standing supports.

The rule comes directly from the park’s camping pageOpens in a new tab. and they explicitly state “Hammocks and other items are not permitted to be hung from trees anywhere in the park. Hammocks must only be used with free-standing supports.”

Canyonlands National Park, Utah

Hammocks are not allowed to be tied to anything within Canyonlands National Park. If you use free-standing support, you should be good to go. The rules come from the Superintendent’s Compendium for the park. In the documentOpens in a new tab., it is expressly “prohibits attachment to vegetation, natural features, or government property” of fixed lines such as hammocks.

Capitol Reef National Park, Utah

Hammocks may be used in campgrounds in Capitol Reef National Park “during daylight hours” only. This means that technically hammock camping would not be allowed. You may also use your hammock only at your campsite. This rule can be found on the camping regulations pageOpens in a new tab. of the park’s website.

Carlsbad Caverns National Park, New Mexico

There are no campgrounds within the Carlsbad Caverns National Park, but backcountry camping is allowed. You can go hammock camping in the backcountry but it will be very difficult to find a place to hang in this park. Ther rules pageOpens in a new tab. of the park’s website says nothing about restricting hammock usage in the backcountry.

Channel Islands National Park, California

Hammock usage is allowed but it would be very difficult in Channel Islands National Park. There are not many suitable trees on the islands, and camping can only be done for the most part in designated campgrounds (where no suitable place to hang exists). Even backcountry camping must be done in designated areas. There are no specific exemptions from hammock usage in the Superintendent’s Compendium document.Opens in a new tab.

Congaree National Park, South Carolina

Hammock camping is allowed in the campgrounds located within Congaree National Park. This rule can be found on the park’s camping pageOpens in a new tab.. Backcountry camping holds similar rules as there are no designated backcountry campsites, hammock camping isn’t a problem. The same goes for day use hammock use, the park is friendly towards hammocks.

Crater Lake National Park, Oregon

Hammocks are allowed to be used in Crater Lake National Park, the rule on this can be found on the park’s frequently asked questions pageOpens in a new tab.. The park requires that you use padding between the hammock straps and the trees in order to prevent damage to the trees.

Cuyahoga Valley National Park, Ohio

Hammocks are allowed to be used in the campgrounds and for day use at Cuyahoga Valley National Park. There are no specific rules against hammock usage as outlined in the Superintendent’s Compendium documentOpens in a new tab.. However, backcountry camping is prohibited in the park and so is overnight backcountry hammock camping.

Death Valley National Park, California, and Nevada

Hanging a hammock in death valley is very difficult since there are very few trees to be found in the main areas of the park. Hammocks are allowed to be used in the campgrounds if you can find something to support them. There are no express written rules on the park’s pageOpens in a new tab. that prohibit hammock usage.

Denali National Park, Alaska

Hammocks are allowed in Denali National Park with very little expressly written rules. In some parts of the park, you might find it difficult to find a place to hang a hammock due to the rocky tundra landscape that covers a large part of the park. The laws and policies pageOpens in a new tab. for the park does not say anything about hammocks.

Dry Tortugas National Park, Florida

Hammocks are not allowed to be strapped to trees in the Dry Tortugas National Park. The park’s brochure states that all camping gear must be free-standing. This means you could have a hammock if you were able to bring a free stand for it. In fact, nothing is allowed to be attached to the trees within the park. For more information on these rules, please see the brochure hereOpens in a new tab..

Everglades National Park, Florida

Hammocks are allowed in the front country campgrounds that are operated in the Everglades National Park on trees that are able to safely support them. The backcountry is a different story because backcountry sites in the Everglades are all tent sites.

Hanging a hammock is difficult and not recommended since all campsites in the backcountry require a freestanding tent. You can find more information on these backcountry campsites in the park’s wilderness trip planner pageOpens in a new tab..

Gates of the Arctic National Park, Alaska

Hammocks are allowed to be used in Gates of the Arctic National Park, but you might find it difficult to use them since the park sits entirely within the arctic circle. Generally, the “tree line” is the area of the world where trees stop growing because it is too cold and rugged year-round to support them. Much of the Gates of the Arctic National Park falls into this category.

Gateway Arch National Park, Missouri, and Illinois

Hammock usage is not a good idea at Gateway Arch National Park since it is a memorial. Entry does require you go through security, and generally, the grounds are not a good place for hanging a hammock.

Glacier Bay National Park, Alaska

Hammocks are allowed in Glacier Bay National Park. There are no specific restrictions on their use besides following the obvious leave no trace principles. You may find it very difficult to find a suitable terrain to hang in this National Park. For specific rules on this park, you can see the Superintendent’s Compendium document here.Opens in a new tab.

Glacier National Park, Montana

Hammocks are allowed to be used in Glacier National Park. In front country campgrounds, the rule is that “only single-person hammocks are permitted and only over the existing tent pads and affixed using straps one inch or greater in width.” This rule can be found in the Superintendent’s Compendium documentOpens in a new tab..

Hammock usage in the backcountry is a lot more “relaxed” as you can see on the Glacier National Park blogOpens in a new tab. it describes the amazing experiences that hanging in the backcountry of the park can bring.

Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona

Hammocks are allowed in most areas of Grand Canyon National Park, provided you do not cause damage to any sensitive desert vegetation. One rule on hammocks is that they must be “taken down when not in immediate use. “ you can find this rule in Mather Campground brochure guideOpens in a new tab..

In the backcountry located beneath the rim, hammocks may be used on man-made structures and not natural features for leave no trace reasons. There are two backpacking sites that are suitable for this kind of usage: Indian Garden and Bright Angel.

Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming

There are no specific rules against hammock usage in Grand Teton National Park. This includes front country campgrounds and the backcountry. All additional rules and regulations normally found in the Superintendent’s Compendium documentOpens in a new tab. list no prohibitions for hammock usage.

Great Basin National Park, Nevada

There are no specific rules against hammock usage in Great Basin National Park. This includes in the front country campgrounds and in the backcountry. The Superintendent’s Compendium documentOpens in a new tab. does not list and special regulations on hammock usage.

Great Sand Dunes National Park, Colorado

Hammocks are not allowed to be hung from trees within Great Sand Dunes National Park. Hammocks may not be used in the Pinon Flats Campground or and backcountry campsite. You can find this rule in the Superintendent’s Compendium documentOpens in a new tab..

Great Smoky Mountains National Park, North Carolina, and Tennessee

Hammocks are allowed in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. In campgrounds, hammocks may be set up in places where tents would normally be placed. Hammocks may not be set up in an area where resource damage could occur due to hammock usage. These rules can be found in the Superintendent’s Compendium documentOpens in a new tab..

In the backcountry, hammocks may only be used in designated backcountry campsites. The park has shelters in the backcountry where hammocks may not be used. Backcountry rules for hammocks can be found on the backcountry pageOpens in a new tab. of the park’s website.

Guadalupe Mountains National Park, Texas

Hammocks are allowed in Guadalupe National Park.. There are no specific restrictions on their use besides following the obvious leave no trace principles. For specific rules on this park, you can see the Superintendent’s Compendium document here.Opens in a new tab.

Haleakalā National Park, Hawaii

Hammocks are allowed in Hot Springs National Park. There are some specific restrictions such as in campgrounds hammocks are “limited to trees more than 10 inches in diameter with adequate padding and within the footprint of the campsite. These specific rules can be seen in the Superintendent’s Compendium document here.Opens in a new tab.

Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park, Hawaii

Hammocks are allowed in Hot Springs National Park. There are no specific restrictions on their use besides following the obvious leave no trace principles. For specific rules on this park, you can see the Superintendent’s Compendium document here.Opens in a new tab.

Hot Springs National Park, Arkansas

Hammocks are allowed in Hot Springs National Park. There are no specific restrictions on their use besides following the obvious leave no trace principles. The best place to hang is most likely in the campground. For specific rules on this park, you can see the Superintendent’s Compendium document here.Opens in a new tab.

Indiana Dunes National Park, Indiana

Hammocks are allowed in Indiana Dunes National Park. There are no specific restrictions on their use besides following the obvious leave no trace principles. The best place to hang is most likely in the campground. For specific rules on this park, you can see the Superintendent’s Compendium document here.Opens in a new tab.

Isle Royale National Park, Michigan

Hammocks are allowed in Isle Royale National Park. There is really only one specific restriction that “Hammocks may not be hung at shelter sites or within shelters.”. As long as you are following basic leave no trace principles, then hanging should be fine. This hammock specific rule can be seen in the Superintendent’s Compendium document hereOpens in a new tab..

Joshua Tree National Park, California

Hammocks are allowed in Joshua Tree, but with many restrictions. Hammocks are not allowed to be used in campgrounds. Hammocks may not be tied to any vegetation, especially the Joshua Trees. If you want to use a hammock in Joshua Tree then use free-standing supports or attach the hammock to a rock formation outside of a developed campground. You can find these rules on the park’s camping regulations pageOpens in a new tab..

Katmai National Park, Alaska

Hammocks are allowed in Katmai National Park. There are no specific restrictions on their use besides following the obvious leave no trace principles. You may find it difficult to use a hammock in many areas of the park. For specific rules on this park, you can see the Superintendent’s Compendium document here.Opens in a new tab.

Kenai Fjords National Park, Alaska

Hammocks are allowed in Kenai Fjords National Park. There are no specific restrictions on their use besides following the obvious leave no trace principles. For specific rules on this park, you can see the Superintendent’s Compendium document here.Opens in a new tab.

Kings Canyon National Park, California

Hammocks are allowed in Kings Canyon National Park in both the developed campgrounds and in the backcountry provided you practice minimum impact hang techniques. There are no express rules against the use of hammocks listed in the Superintendent’s Compendium documentOpens in a new tab..

Kobuk Valley National Park, Alaska

Hammocks are allowed in Kobuk Valley National Park. There are no specific restrictions on hammock usage. Like a lot of parks in Alaska, Kobuk Valley has no roads and no designated campgrounds. Getting to the park can only be done by flying. Some of the terrains could prove difficult to find a suitable place to hang.

Lake Clark National Park, Alaska

Hammocks are allowed in Lassen Volcanic National Park. There are no specific restrictions on their use as you can see in the Superintendent’s Compendium document here.Opens in a new tab. Getting to the park can only be done by flying or boating as there are no roads. Some of the terrains could prove difficult to find a suitable place to hang.

Lassen Volcanic National Park, California

Hammocks are allowed in Lassen Volcanic National Park. There are no specific restrictions on their use besides following the obvious leave no trace principles. For specific rules on this park, you can see the Superintendent’s Compendium document here.Opens in a new tab.

Mammoth Cave National Park, Kentucky

Hammocks are allowed in Mount Rainier National Park. There are no specific restrictions on their use besides following the obvious leave no trace principles. For specific rules on this park, you can see the Superintendent’s Compendium document here.Opens in a new tab.

Mesa Verde National Park, Colorado

Hammocks are allowed in Mesa Verde National Park within the campground. There are no specific restrictions on their use besides following the obvious leave no trace principles and the fact that the park limits backcountry use. For specific rules on this park, you can see the Superintendent’s Compendium document here.Opens in a new tab.

Mount Rainier National Park, Washington

Hammocks are allowed in Mount Rainier National Park. There are no specific restrictions on their use besides following the obvious leave no trace principles. For specific rules on this park, you can see the Superintendent’s Compendium document here.Opens in a new tab.

National Park of American Samoa, American Samoa

There is no camping allowed in the National Park of American Samoa. 90% of the land is owned by the local people and so in order to use any of the land you must get permission from the owner. The same goes for hanging a hammock. Hammocks are usually found near the lodging areas on the island, but for any personal hammock use, you would need permission from landowners.

North Cascades National Park, Washington

Hammocks are allowed in North Cascades National Park. There are no specific restrictions on their use besides following the obvious leave no trace principles. For specific rules on this park, you can see the Superintendent’s Compendium document here.Opens in a new tab.

Olympic National Park, Washington

Hammocks are allowed in Olympic National Park. There are no specific restrictions on their use besides following the obvious leave no trace principles. For specific rules on this park, you can see the Superintendent’s Compendium document here.Opens in a new tab.

Petrified Forest National Park, Arizona

Hammocks are allowed in the Petrified Forest National Park, but you will find it very difficult to find a place to hang. Any vegetation in the park is protected and may not have anything tied to it. There are no campgrounds within the park, Backpacking is the only way to camp within the park itself and you are better off using a tent than a hammock in this National Park. You can see specific rules for this park in the Superintendent’s Compendium document hereOpens in a new tab..

Pinnacles National Park, California

Hammocks are allowed in Pinnacles National Park, but the terrain might make it difficult to find a place to hang. Pinnacles National Monument was redesignated as a National Park in 2013 so the rules are subject to change since the park is newer and may evolve over time. For specific rules on the park, you can see the Superintendent’s Compendium document here.Opens in a new tab.

Redwood National Park, California

Hammocks are not allowed to be tied to trees in Redwood National Park. You may use a hammock if you have a free-stand for your hammock. The Redwood National Park’s Camping pageOpens in a new tab. states that the use of hammocks can mutilate trees’ bark and so setting them up on trees is not allowed.

Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado

Hammock usage within the campgrounds inside Rocky Mountain National Park is limited to the immediate footprint of the campgrounds itself. Hammock usage in the backcountry is allowed as long as you do not cause damage to the vegetation.

Timber Creek Campground does not allow any hammock usage, the reason being that the campground does not have mature enough trees. All of these rules on hammock usage can be found in the Superintendent’s Compendium document here.Opens in a new tab.

Saguaro National Park, Arizona

Hammocks are allowed in Saguaro National Park in the park’s higher elevation where trees grow. In the desert areas, you should never attach a hammock to a Cactus for obvious reasons. All regulations for the park can be found here, as you can see there is no specific hammock restriction, but all plants like the Saguaro Cactus are protected.

Sequoia National Park, California

Hammocks are allowed in Sequoia National Park in both the developed campgrounds and in the backcountry provided you practice minimum impact hang techniques. There are no express rules against the use of hammocks listed on the restrictions pageOpens in a new tab. of the park’s website.

Shenandoah National Park, Virginia

Hammock usage is allowed in both developed campgrounds and in the backcountry of Shenandoah National Park. There are no expressly written regulationsOpens in a new tab. prohibiting hammock usage, and many people enjoy using hammocks within the park.

Theodore Roosevelt National Park, North Dakota

Hammocks are allowed in Theodore Roosevelt National Park provided you are not causing and damage to the trees. Both in the developed campgrounds and in the backcountry, there are no expressly written rules prohibitingOpens in a new tab. hammock usage. Most of the park is grassland, so it might be difficult to find a place to hang.

Virgin Islands National Park, Virgin Islands

Hammocks are not allowed to be used in the Virgin Islands National Park. The Superintendent’s Compendium specifically states that “The stapling, nailing, tying, or attaching any material to any vegetation, living or dead, or to utility poles and signposts is prohibited.” Which basically means that hammocks cannot be used. You can find these rules in their document hereOpens in a new tab..

Voyageurs National Park, Minnesota

Hammocks are allowed in Voyageurs National Park, there are no expressly written rules against the use of hammocks on the park’s regulations pageOpens in a new tab.. Just keep in mind that all campsites within the park are only accessible by watercraft.

Wind Cave National Park, South Dakota

Hammock use is allowed in Wind Cave National Park. If you can find suitable trees in the park’s developed campground or in the backcountry while backpacking. The park’s backcountry camping pageOpens in a new tab. lists the rules for setting up camp, and none of them forbid hammock camping.

Wrangell-St. Elias National Park, Alaska

Hammocks are allowed in Wrangell-St. Elias National Park. You may find it difficult in many areas of the backcountry to find a suitable place to hang a hammock. The laws and policies pageOpens in a new tab. on the park’s website lists nothing explicitly stating that hammocks are not allowed to be used in the park.

Yellowstone National Park, Idaho, Montana, and Wyoming

Hammock camping is allowed in the developed campgrounds in Yellowstone but you should proceed with extreme caution because many of the park’s animals can run into a hanging hammock. For this reason, it seems that many campers in the park have been required to take down their hammocks when not actively in use. There have also been some problems with tickets due to damage to trees from straps.

The backcountry in Yellowstone is a different story, Hammock opportunities are abundant, and it seems that hammock usage is not as generally frowned upon as it seems to be in front-country campsites.

Yosemite National Park, California

Hammock camping and usage can be done in the developed campgrounds provided they do not create a “hazardous condition”. Additionally, they must be padded in order to help prevent damage to trees. Oak trees are not allowed to have hammocks attached to them. These rules can be found on the park’s campground regulations page.Opens in a new tab.

The rules are similar for backcountry use and general day use in Yosemite. Hammocks can be used for day use purposes in areas where access is allowed. In the backcountry, you can hammock camp, but at higher elevations, it may be more difficult to find suitable trees.

Zion National Park, Utah

Hammocks camping can be done in developed campgrounds only within the “footprint of the campsite”. Hammocks can also not hang over vegetation. You can find this rule on the campgrounds pageOpens in a new tab. on the park’s website.

Hammock usage in the backcountry is also allowed provided you find a suitable tree in which is able to safely support the hammock and not cause damage to the tree itself.

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Zachary Smith

Zach is an avid outdoorsman that loves going camping with his Prius every chance he gets. He also regularly enjoys hiking and fishing. When he's not outside you can probably find him writing about it on this website. See his full bio here

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